DAILY PROMPT: You’re A Mean One Mr. Grinch – Catch .22

The quality in others that bugs me the most has to be ignorance and lack of care for others. On a more biased note it REALLY bugs me when people do not even attempt to understand, tolerate, and/or genuinely care about veterans, military, and their families. Being that I am surrounded by the military culture everyday these peoples have not only become my family (quite literally) but have also become my passion. So it is only natural that I be a bit biased towards everything pertaining to them. Ironically one of my least favorite characteristics in people may also be one of the least desirable characteristics in myself. While I try my best (but can always do better) to be understanding and caring of others I too am not always great at this. There are many things I am ignorant about myself. I have actually thought quite a bit about this contradiction and how to solve it in myself as it both frustrates and confounds me. 

It can be really difficult, especially if you’re an over thinker like me, to both be passionate about something and unbiased about it at the same time. In fact, I’d venture to say that it’s basically impossible. One can surely work to understand and listen to opposing sides of something, but by human nature we are biased. Period. It’s also pretty impossible as humans to know and care deeply about any and every cause out there. We can support all the causes we find “good”..cancer, veterans, abused children, AIDS awareness, ext….however being active and genuinely passionate (in the word’s deepest form of meaning) of so many things is simply impossible. And what I’ve learned over time is that is OK. In fact, this kind of biased can be a GOOD thing.

If we were all passionate about everything we thought worthy of our passion then we would never get anything done (as funny as that sounds). It’s the same idea that if EVERYONE was an amazing football player, then essentially NO ONE would be a great football player because we would all be equal. Or the fact (yes I said it, FACT) that not EVERYONE can be a winner, otherwise NO ONE would win. 

We are all good at certain things because if we were all good at the same thing we would never accomplish anything. Society and life requires that we all be better at different things. We all have our unique gifts and likewise we all have our unique passions. If everyone was passionate about fighting cancer, then who would be left to stand up for abused children? If we were all passionate about teaching, then who would there be to invent advancing technology?

In realizing this I have also formed the opinion that I believe counseling would be so much more productive and helpful if we didn’t have just “general psychologist/counselors/ext” but if each psychologist/counselor worked specifically with the issues they were most passionate about. Of course a theory like this requires a perfect world where we would never be short of counselors for every kind of issue/peoples. But hear me out. If I am most passionate about military, veterans, and other service workers such as police and firefighters then I am naturally going to be much better at helping them and listening to them than I would be at listening to someone, who say, suffers from multiple personality disorder. However someone who is very passionate about families and children and keeping them together are going to be much better at marriage, family, and child counseling. 

This is not to say that I don’t care deeply about all kinds of people and issues, but we all have specific passions. And even as someone whose passion is to help people through counseling, generally speaking they will also have a more specific passion for certain types of issues. I think by focusing on our passions this would not only make for better counseling and help, but also less burnout for counselors and psychologists/psychiatrists.

So I guess to get back to the point of this whole rant. While we all have our pet peeves and dislikes, we are all just as guilty of distasteful characteristics to others. However I think that, like our differences in passions, our differences in personality go hand in hand. We are all different, and we cannot expect to like everyone around us, but through our differences comes the success and beauty of mankind.

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180 Degrees

This is quite a bit out of order but it’s going to take me a little time to get the blog all set up and I have several posts to make. Regardless this is something that happened recently and seemed like a good start. This post is just to give a little insight..

I am a very lucky woman that my husband opens up to me and trusts me with his emotions stemming from PTSD as well as he does. Having been with my husband for two years now I tend to think I’ve got him all figured out. When you’re around someone long enough you pick up on a lot of things almost on a self conscious level. Their body language and tone of voice give off all sorts of cues that you learn to notice and read without much thought, thus knowing them so intimately you can (hopefully) learn to react to their cues in the best ways possible.

For example, when I get overly stressed (or am tired and hungry) I often tend to breakdown faster than a four year old without a nap on Christmas day. My husband, bless his heart, has to put up with me..but he does an amazing job. He can pick up on my body language and triggers pulling the pieces together before I fall apart at all. He’s the best kind of medicine as far as I’m concerned. Similarly, I can tell better than anyone when he’s off his game. I can often tell if he had nightmares the night prior before even HE notices his mood change in the morning. All by the cues I’ve learned to pick up without much hesitation or confusion.

This week however, was different. Like I said I’m lucky my husband is so open with me. He has shared many stories and feelings with me about his time in Iraq and the Corp, but even he isn’t always able to open up to me completely. I don’t think anyone ever could after going through even half of what our men and women have gone through over there. A couple days ago a man that deployed with my husband shared a story on his blog about an RPG that had hit their humvee in Iraq. I recognized the story as one my husband had told me about, only this was from another Marine’s perspective. It was a little indescribable how it felt to read it from someone else’s point of view. I had never heard anything about his time in the Corp from anyone but him. I guess I could call it humbling, and since I have always been very curious and interested in his past it felt good to learn even more about my husband.

Typically when my husband has a “bad day”, by this I am referring to PTSD, it starts in the morning when he wakes up and lasts most of the day. Sometimes it can happen later if he naps and has nightmares..those seem to be his biggest triggers. Usually. Other times it can stem from talking too much about the war. I can usually pick up quickly on his body language and verbal cues and redirect the conversation before it has any lasting effect on the day. That afternoon, however, I did not pick up on it fast enough. When he picked me up from work that day I told him about the blog post and how it was really interesting for me to hear it from another perspective. (Rather than hearing my husband tell me what happened in a humble no-big-deal kinda way, I got to read one of his fellow marines give thanks and credit to my husband and a few other ‘brothers’ for saving their lives that day). It made me proud to hear confirmation from others that he is the hero I look up to everyday.

Something in the seemingly harmless information I shared with him, mixed with what things he could have already been dealing with in his head that day, triggered a very quick 180 degree turn in his mood. He went from normal and happy to very quiet and dejected in a matter of a sentence. Let me stop and give a brief description of my husband. He’s a very strong man. Your typical broad shouldered, defined farmer’s muscles, strong square jawline, rough hands kinda guy. Along with a presence that demands obedience in a room. He is very much an alpha male. And he’s fought, front lines, in the bloodiest battle of BOTH the wars. He is a scout, infantryman, he is a Marine…..This strong man, my husband, went suddenly silent, and was on the verge of shaky tears by the time we got to the first stop light. Listen. This man does not cry.

I quickly went into my comforting wife mode, apologizing and asking what was wrong.

“It’s ok…I’m just remembering, and those are memories I just can’t handle today.” He’d responded evenly.

Normally, like I said, I’d have time to catch on and stop a change before it happens, but this time I did not. I learned another quick lesson that day. I do NOT in fact have it “all figured out”. Sometimes because I am so used to my husband and he has come so far with his PTSD and healing, I can forget that he still has to battle this every single day. Sure some days are easier than others, but it is not something that just comes and goes. It is always there in the back of his mind. He works daily to fit back into this thing we call ‘civilian life’. This is the invisible battle.

I believe that learning to cope and to be there for your spouse is something that grows and changes constantly even in your average everyday marriages. Learning how to be there for your spouse who may have PTSD or TBI is no different. It is important to learn from mistakes and experiences, but one must always remember we will never have it all figured out. But that is ok. I am a firm believer that as long as someone always genuinely tries their best to be better they can not fail. Learning to be the best for your loved one is an organic ever-growing process.